Beth Moore · German · German Sauerkraut · Mom · Oma's Kraut · Quotes · Sunday · thoughts · Uncategorized

Sunday Thought – Mom and Food

“Sometimes you cook stuff for holidays that your mama made, not because you like it so much but because you liked her and miss her the most.” – Beth Moore

Wanting kraut and missing Mom.

Blessings.

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Bariatric Surgery - My Story · German · Recipes · Uncategorized · WLS

Pretzels 

Another one of the German box mixes in the GermanFoodbox.com subscription was the German Pretzel Mix.  This one was more complicated but wonderful.

Prepared the mix per the instructions (mix flour and yeast with warm water, mix with a dough hook), and let rise.I kneaded the dough, and shaped.  This was the difficult part.  I was not schooled in making pretzels, and it was apparent! Baked, and this was the result.  The flavor and texture were good.  The appearance was lacking…but again, yummy!

Had two bites with unsalted butter – memories of Germany.  Loved trying this, but not sure that I want to make them again.   It was a fun trying to make them.

Blessings!

Bariatric Surgery - My Story · desserts · fall · German · Recipes · Uncategorized · WLS

Blueberry Streusel Pie

David and I subscribed to the German Box monthly delivery for a couple of months to see what they would send.  We received some different items, but mostly box mixes of stuff I used to love when in Germany.

One of the items they sent was the Kathi German Streusel.   I had a can of blueberry pie filling, and wanted to give it a try.


I followed the instructions on the box.  Although it says to use a spring form pan, I used a pie plate.  But the mix came together really well.Sprayed the bottom with non-stick spray, and pressed in 3/4’s of the mixture to the bottom of the pie plate.I didn’t just want a blueberry pie.  I wanted something a little more German.  I used 1/2 cup of sour cream, an egg, and 1/4 cup of granulated sugar – mixed it together and poured in the bottom of the crust.Then I dropped the pie filling onto of the cream mixture.Again, followed the instructions to use the rest of the streusel mix to the top.Bake at 350 degrees for 45 minutes or until a toothpick comes out clean in the middle.Let cool, and enjoy.  (Refrigerate after completely cool.)

It was so yummy.  As like most German desserts, it wasn’t overly sweet.  The sour cream mixture made it creamy, and cheesecake like but without the density.   I will definitely make this again.  I have Googled where to purchase the cake mix, and hope to get it again before Christmas.

 

German · Mom · onions · Recipes · Uncategorized

Zwiebelkuchen

Zwiebelkuchen or Onion Pie

You can find the original recipe at schnippelboy.  It is in German (I use a translator on the page).  I didn’t use his recipe for the crust as I didn’t have yeast, so I used Bisquick.  I made it a little thick – and in a round pan as well.

I also added allspice to the seasoning.  My mom always did this with her cabbage and onion pies.  He uses cumin, and I decreased it as well.

Ingredients:
Pizza Dough for crust
4-5 Onions sliced, and cooked until translucent
3 eggs
3/4 cup sour cream
Cumin, allspice, caraway seeds, dried parsley, salt and pepper

Directions:
Cook the onions in some oil and butter (about half and half) with the cumin, allspice and salt and pepper.  Cool slightly. Mix together eggs and sour cream.  Add the caraway seeds, and dried parsley to mixture.  Layer the onions on the pizza dough (pressed out in your choice of pan, brush with olive oil).  Pour the egg mixture on top of the onions.  Bake at 400 degrees until cooked through (approximately 40-45 minutes).

I did enjoy this, as did David.  I will be searching for some other onion pie recipes as this one was close to my Mom’s, but just not there.

Blessings!

Bariatric Surgery - My Story · German · Recipes · Uncategorized · WLS

Bratwurst

Weisswurst…bratwurst.

Cravings.  I walk around the grocery store thinking about what I haven’t had to eat in a while, and what to cook for the week.  I make lists, and follow those, but in general it is cravings that fuel our weekly menu’s.

I haven’t cooked bratwurst in a long time.  My family has preferred to have the traditional knockwurst.  Different flavors, and to me, a lot more fat.

I found this Dietz & Watson Black Forest Bratwurst, and thought I would cook one or two up for just me.  Again, thinking that I would be the only one really wanting to eat it.


I normally cook my bratwurst in beer in a slow simmer.  We didn’t have any, but David drinks (on occasion) Smith & Forge Hard Cider.  Per their website:  Hard cider is a strong, sturdy but not-too-sweet fermented alcoholic beverage built from the juice of apples.  And, David said “apples and pork go together.  I watch the Food Network.” Yes, they do.

So, we simmered the bratwurst in 3/4 of a can of the cider until evaporated.

 Then just seared until golden brown (I like my a little darker – crisp).

I ate mine with a bit of Dijon mustard. It was perfect.  

David really enjoyed his, and we both loved the flavor of the apple cider.  Will use this again when cooking bratwurst or maybe even kielbasa.

Blessings.

 

Bariatric Surgery - My Story · German · German Potato Salad · memories · Recipes · Uncategorized · WLS

Potato Nibble 

When my Mom used to make her German Potato Salad, she would make a peel or two have a little more potato on it than she would really like to have.  It was a nibble for me.  

So I had to do the same when I made the potato salad the other day.  Of course, my peels had more potato on them just because I don’t peel potatoes often enough (my Mom would say). Ha.Add some butter and  salt…and it is perfect.My portion size…for my tummy.  Ha.  Not anywhere near the amount I used to have.  Thank goodness.

Loved the flavor memories from this simple dish.  I loved thinking of my Mom while making the potato salad, but especially loved this nibble.  It was something so small, but always a fond memory.

Blessings.

German · German Potato Salad · Mom · Recipes · Uncategorized

German Potato Salad

This is the way my Mom would make potato salad. I swear there are as many different variations of potato salads as there are people.

So…

Potatoes – Mom loved Yukon Gold potatoes for her potato salad.  So…that it is what I used.

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Clean them with cold water, scrubbing the dirt off.  Place in a large pot, with cold water and bring to boil.  We add salt here (not a lot).

Once fork tender (I think I cooked them about 2 minutes too long. They were a little mushy).  So depending on the size of the potatoes, this could take anywhere from 8 – 20 minutes.

Cool on a clean kitchen towel or paper towels.  Peeling comes next.  I have tried to do this with the potatoes already peeled…it doesn’t taste the same.  Really.

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While the potatoes are boiling, cook some bacon.  I cook mine in the oven (place bacon strips on a cookie sheet covered in foil at 350 degrees for about 20-25 minutes).

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img_0426So once the potatoes are peeled, and cooled a bit, slice and place in a large bowl.  Add salt and pepper.  img_0432img_0437Chop a bunch of green onions, add to the potatoes (reserve some for topping).

img_0442I consider this the secret…Beef Bouillon.  You can leave this out, but it adds a subtle hint of flavor, and added moisture.  Bring a cube with water to boil, and cool.  Spoon over warm potatoes (about a 1/4 cup).

img_0422img_0423img_0441Then it is just vinegar and oil depending on taste.  We have always liked it with more vinegar. 

img_0443Add more vinegar than oil, but enough to stir in for flavor.  It should be wet, like a dressing for a lettuce salad.

img_0444Add the chopped bacon (about 6 medium slices).


Forgot to take a plate picture.  It was yummy.  Nice memories for a Memorial Day weekend. 

Blessings. 

German · memories · Random Thoughts · thoughts · traditions · Uncategorized

Happy May Day!

One of my first memories of being in Germany is a carnival.  Not sure where exactly I was, but was with my sister, and we were sitting on a bench watching kids dancing with spring wreaths on their heads.

I found this article here about May Day in Germany:  German Traditions

Maifest (Mayfest) is one of mankind’s oldest traditions! It is the celebration of nature’s bright reawakening after winter’s cold darkness. The ancient pagan festival eventually took on Christian religious significance, much like Christmas. However, it is now a colorful, joyous part of history and culture in Europe! The custom of the maypole began in the tenth century, when villagers would erect a pole in the local square. They would decorate it with sausages, cakes and multicolored ribbons! The villagers would dance around the maypole, as medieval citizens believed that it would bring good luck and wealth!

I will be taking my math final tonight, so not a lot of celebrating today.  But I may have a bratwurst, and a bite of chocolate?

Happy May Day!

Blessings.